Septic Installation & Service

Jernan specializes in comprehensive residential and commercial septic system installation and service. With meticulous attention to detail, we ensure optimal functionality and longevity for every system. Whether for a single-family home or a large commercial property, our expert team customizes solutions to meet specific needs, adhering to industry standards and local regulations. From initial consultation to final inspection, we guide clients through every step of the process, prioritizing efficiency, reliability, and environmental sustainability. With a commitment to excellence and customer satisfaction, we are a trusted partner in managing waste effectively and responsibly for properties throughout central Texas.

Jernan - Septic & Rainwater Solutions

Types of Septic Systems

On-Site Sewage Facilities (OSSF) – Any decentralized wastewater treatment systems which are designed to treat and distribute sewage/wastewater generated by individual homes and businesses, on the location. OSSF’s include conventional septic systems, low pressure dosing systems, evapo-transpiration systems, soil substitution systems, mound systems and advanced treatment systems such as aerobic treatment units, and aerobic bacterial generators. These systems are typically used in locations where centralized sewer systems are not available. Commonly, we use the term “septic system” to identify all types of OSSF’s.

Primary Treatment System – The simplest type of OSSF. Primary treatment systems utilize a tank for separation of the wastewater stream, and a soil treatment area or distribution field for treatment and distribution of the wastewater. The majority of wastewater treatment occurs in the soil treatment area in primary treatment systems.

Secondary Treatment System – These are advanced treatment units. They provide a more thorough treatment of the wastewater internally than a primary treatment system. These systems typically incorporate advanced processes to further break down organic matter and remove pollutants, which results in a cleaner effluent for distribution. Most secondary treatment units are in place following a primary treatment unit. Aerobic bacteria in these units decompose the organic pollutants in the wastewater stream, which reduces the volume of pathogens. These systems produce a cleaner effluent which is more environmentally friendly. These systems are typically more complex and require a greater degree of maintenance and service to ensure proper function.

Primary Treatment Systems

Conventional Septic System

A conventional septic system is a type of OSSF that consists of a septic tank and a soil treatment area or drain field. This is the most common type of OSSF or septic system in the world.

Wastewater that is generated inside of the home or business is introduced to a tank, typically constructed with two compartments. Inside the first compartment, solids are separated from the wastewater column through separation. Heavy solids will settle to the bottom and create a sludge layer while oils, greases and lighter solids will float to the surface and create a scum layer. There are anaerobic bacteria in the tank that very slowly and ineffectively break down the solid material in the wastewater column. This process of separation and bacterial action creates a clear zone in the middle of the water column. Water is then transferred to the second compartment of the tank, where it allows for secondary separation.

From this point the effluent is introduced to the soil treatment area, commonly referred to as the drain field, distribution field, or lateral lines. The distribution component is most commonly constructed of perforated pipe and gravel, however there are other methods with which to construct the distribution component such as leaching chambers, gravelless pipe and others.

The majority of treatment in a conventional septic system occurs in the soil treatment area, through the percolation of the effluent through the soil where natural processes occur by filtering out harmful bacteria, viruses and nutrients. Therefore, it is important to maintain the conditions of the tank through regular and routine pumping in order to prolong the life of the soil treatment area.

Conventional septic systems are passive in nature and rely on gravity and the natural conditions of the soil to treat and dispose of the effluent.

There is a common misconception that septic tanks do not need to be pumped out. This is not true!! Regular maintenance and routine pumping are critical to minimize failure of the septic system. It is recommended these septic systems be pumped every 2-5 years.

Evapo-Transpiration Septic System (ET)

An evapo-transpiration septic system, or ET system, is constructed similarly to a conventional septic system. An ET system is designed to primarily treat and dispose of effluent through the processes of evaporation and transpiration. It is a type of OSSF that consists of a septic tank and a soil treatment area or drain field.

Wastewater that is generated inside of the home or business is introduced to a tank, typically constructed with two compartments. Inside the first compartment, solids are separated from the wastewater column through separation. Heavy solids will settle to the bottom and create a sludge layer while oils, greases and lighter solids will float to the surface and create a scum layer. This process of separation leaves a clear zone in the middle. Water is then transferred to the second compartment of the tank, where it allows for secondary separation.

From this point the effluent is introduced to the soil treatment area, commonly referred to as the drain field, distribution field, or lateral lines. The primary difference between an evapo-transpiration septic system and a conventional septic system is the intended method of distribution to the environment. Whereas a conventional septic system is intended to distribute effluent downward and laterally into the soil for treatment, an evapo-transpiration septic system is intended to utilize the transpiration effect of shallow rooted vegetation as the primary treatment method. Any remaining contaminants in the effluent that are not handled through vegetative uptake are treated as they percolate through the soil.

Evapo-transpiration septic systems are passive in nature and rely on gravity and the natural conditions of the soil to treat and dispose of the effluent.

Evapo-transpiration septic systems have some special conditions that must be met in order to utilize them in the state of Texas.

There is a common misconception that septic tanks do not need to be pumped out. This is not true!! Regular maintenance and routine pumping are critical to minimize failure of the septic system. It is recommended these septic systems be pumped every 2-5 years.

Soil Substitution Septic System

A soil substitution septic system is one where the drain field may be constructed in gravel, rocky, or other soil substrates of high permeability where the septic tank effluent could rapidly reach groundwater without having undergone adequate treatment through soil contact. In this application, the inadequate soil is removed and replaced with a soil that can facilitate proper treatment of the effluent.

Most oftentimes this system is used in an environment where the native soil is too porous. This typically involves removing a rocky soil and replacing it with a sandy soil to provide a soil treatment component prior to the wastewater entering the fissures in the rocky soil. This allows for treatment of the wastewater prior to the wastewater reaching groundwater reserves.

Most soil substitution septic systems are constructed and operate similarly to conventional septic systems.

Wastewater that is generated inside of the home or business is introduced to a tank, typically constructed with two compartments. Inside the first compartment, solids are separated from the wastewater column through separation. Heavy solids will settle to the bottom and create a sludge layer while oils, greases and lighter solids will float to the surface and create a scum layer. There are anaerobic bacteria in the tank that very slowly and ineffectively break down the solid material in the wastewater column. This process of separation and bacterial action creates a clear zone in the middle of the water column. Water is then transferred to the second compartment of the tank, where it allows for secondary separation.

From this point the effluent is introduced to the soil treatment area, commonly referred to as the drain field, distribution field, or lateral lines. The distribution component is most commonly constructed of perforated pipe and gravel, however there are other methods with which to construct the distribution component such as leaching chambers, gravelless pipe and others.

Soil substitution septic systems are passive in nature and rely on gravity and the natural conditions of the soil to treat and dispose of the effluent.

There is a common misconception that septic tanks do not need to be pumped out. This is not true!! Regular maintenance and routine pumping are critical to minimize failure of the septic system. It is recommended these septic systems be pumped every 2-5 years.

Low-Pressure Dosing Septic System (LPD)

A low-pressure dosing septic system is a glorified conventional septic system. It is a type of OSSF that consists of a septic tank, a pump tank, and a soil treatment area or drain field.

Wastewater that is generated inside of the home or business is introduced to a tank, typically constructed with two compartments. Inside the first compartment, solids are separated from the wastewater column through separation. Heavy solids will settle to the bottom and create a sludge layer while oils, greases and lighter solids will float to the surface and create a scum layer. This process of separation leaves a clear zone in the middle. Water is then transferred to the second compartment of the tank, where it allows for secondary separation. From this point the effluent enters a pump tank where it is stored prior to being introduced to the soil treatment area.

The low-pressure dosing septic system uses a pump to pressurize distribution and promote a more equalized distribution throughout the soil treatment area, in an effort to prolong its life.

Low-pressure dosing septic systems are typically used in soils that are not suitable for a conventional septic system, and the property owner desires not to have a secondary treatment unit. The majority of treatment in a low-pressure dosing septic system occurs in the soil treatment area, therefore it is important to maintain the conditions of the tank through regular and routine pumping in an effort to prolong the life of the soil treatment area.

The low-pressure dosing septic system is slightly more active in nature than the aforementioned systems, in that it utilizes a pump to promote distribution to the soil treatment area. Once the effluent is introduced the soil treatment area however it undergoes the same treatment process as conventional septic systems.

There is a common misconception that septic tanks do not need to be pumped out. This is not true!! Regular maintenance and routine pumping are critical to minimize failure of the septic system. It is recommended these septic systems be pumped every 2-5 years.

Mound Septic Systems

A mound septic system is constructed quite similarly to a low-pressure dosing septic system except however, they are constructed at grade.

Wastewater that is generated inside of the home or business is introduced to a tank, typically constructed with two compartments. Inside the first compartment, solids are separated from the wastewater column through separation. Heavy solids will settle to the bottom and create a sludge layer while oils, greases and lighter solids will float to the surface and create a scum layer. This process of separation leaves a clear zone in the middle. Water is then transferred to the second compartment of the tank, where it allows for secondary separation. From this point the effluent enters a pump tank where it is stored prior to being introduced to the soil treatment area.

The mound septic system uses a pump to pressurize distribution and promote a more equalized distribution throughout the soil treatment area.

Mound septic systems are typically constructed in soils that are not suitable for a conventional septic system, such as locations with shallow ground water levels, shallow bedrock, or poor soil drainage. The effluent is pumped into a series of lateral lines that are installed at the top of a constructed mound. As the effluent percolates through the soils, treatment through filtration and the action of aerobic bacteria in the soils occurs. Once the water migrates through the mound, it then percolates downward into the native soils below for final disposal.

The majority of treatment in a mound septic system occurs in the soil treatment area, therefore it is important to maintain the conditions of the tank through regular and routine pumping in an effort to prolong the life of the soil treatment area.

There is a common misconception that septic tanks do not need to be pumped out. This is not true!! Regular maintenance and routine pumping are critical to minimize failure of the septic system. It is recommended these septic systems be pumped every 2-5 years.

Secondary Treatment Systems

Aerobic Treatment Units

Aerobic treatment units, or aerobic systems are secondary treatment systems that utilize aerobic bacteria to break down organic matter in sewage or wastewater.

These systems typically consist of a trash tank followed by a chamber, where the wastewater undergoes treatment through aeration. This aeration provides a high level of dissolved oxygen for bacteria to flourish and break down the introduced waste. The aeration chamber is followed by a clarification chamber, where suspended solids should be settled out of the water column and be reintroduced to treatment.

This process typically results in a cleaner effluent that can be safely reintroduced to the environment. Most often this is performed through the use of pop-up style sprinkler heads and surface irrigation. Other methods of distribution, like subsurface drip irrigation, can be utilized depending upon site conditions and owner’s desires.

Being a secondary treatment system, aerobic treatment units are an active method of wastewater treatment. These systems utilize active processes internally to treat and process the wastewater. Upon distribution, in a properly functioning system, post-treatment, the effluent should be clean enough to distribute at grade.

There is a common misconception that septic tanks do not need to be pumped out. This is not true!! Regular maintenance and routine pumping are critical to minimize failure of the septic system. It is recommended these septic systems be pumped every 2-5 years.

Aerobic Bacterial Generators

A device that is designed to cultivate and accelerate the growth of aerobic bacteria. The SludgeHammer® aerobic bacterial generator uses a proprietary blend of facultative bacteria to break down organic matter more rapidly and thoroughly in an OSSF. The generator provides controlled aeration, and recirculation of the tanks contents through the generator column, creating a cleaner effluent than other comparable systems on the market.

Other Systems

There are other types of secondary treatment systems on the market, however, they are not as common in our area. Please reach out to us with any questions you may have regarding other options that are not listed here.

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